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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
out across north america? simply put, under barack obama and hillary clinton, the u.s. has been unwilling to lead. and this has left a huge vacuum on the world stage. in a recent assessment of secretary clinton's tenure. michael owe o'hanlon of the brookings institute wrote even an admirers such as myself must admit few big problems were soflted on her watch. few big vic trises achieved. secretary clinton's work at the state department should be judged on whether she has left america's foreign policy in stronger or weaker position. most think the future lies with china than the u.s. it's not all mrs. clinton's fault. but the fact is we just don't have the influence we used to have around the world from syria to mali, we have led from behind, so in effect the former secretary of state has helped manage our decline in what looks increasingly like a post american world. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. another view on this, joining us now from new york, fox news contributor julie ragenski and former advisor to frank lautenberg and president rosenberg a center left thin
to become at the next u.s. defense secretary. the question was expected to be tough but he appeared uncomfortable, even unprepared. the most heated exchange of the day came from a former close friend, senator john mccain who grilled hagel on opposing the 2007 u.s. troop surge in iraq. >> wiere you correct or incorret when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to -- >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is, were you right or wrong. that's a pretty straight forward question. >> well, i -- >> i would like the answer whether you're right or wrong and then you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> well, let the record show you refuse to answer that question. please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> actually, i would like an answer, yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. it's far more complicated than that. my answer is i'll defer that judgment to
to check it out. it was and still is more than just a commuter hub. during world war ii. 80% of the u.s. military's eastbound movement relied on grand central. in fact, the nazis even plotted to blow it up in the 70s, the city almost tore it down. these days, grand central is an iconic landmark but a train station first got on track 100 years ago today. next time you are here you ought to check that place out. man, it is beautiful. and now you know the news for this friday, february the 1st already. 2013. i'm shepard smith. see you back on monday, which should be a national holiday. >> laura: the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> i'm proud of the work we have done to elevate diplomacy and development, to serve the nation we all love. >> and hillary clinton ends her term as secretary of state, "newsweek" proclaims that she is the most powerful woman in american history. really? we'll have a debate. >> we inherited the worst financial crisis and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. >> laura: unemployment on the rise again as the economy continues to falter. who will pres
: this is "the new york times" from february 20th. budget cuts seen as risk to growth in the u.s. economy. the cuts, most likely would reduce growth by 1 1/2 of a percentage point in 2013, according to a range of government and private forecasters. that could be enough though to again slow the arrival of a recovery, producing instead another year of sluggish growth and high unemployment. >> guest: well i guess if you take it from "the new york times" perspective you could make that argument because i think they see already a slowing in growth happening and this makes a convenient fall person for bad public policy been in place under four years of obama administration. we have slowed growth. it has been very stagnant. there are a lot of reasons for it. there are a lot of friction points put in place in our economy that need to be fixed. until we get our confess and the president of the united states to work together and begin to remove those friction points we'll continue have slow growth. if you look at a same slide you had up a moment ago ago, shows the sequester on the right hand of tha
, technically i wear one. the u.s. postal service®, no business too small. martha: you are the seth mcfa martha: "happening now" starts right now. jon: brand-new stories and breaking news. jenna: four days ago in washington's fight to avoid steep budget cuts u. may feel it in a big way on your next trip to the airport. more on the olympic icon charged with premeditated murder. we have the latest on the "blade runner" charged with killing his girlfriend. a second serving of severe winter weather. it's all happening now. countdown to the sequester showdown. hi, everybody, i'm jenna lee. and i just floated this idea to our audience. you know the jaws music from the academy awards? every time we say sequester this week i'm wondering if it should come up. jon: a little audio cue. jenna: both because it's a little ridiculous and also because everyone is making it so dramatic. jon: i'm i'm jon scott. four days until the cuts kick in. democrats holding a news conference now with the air travel association on how sequestration will affect air travelers, but they are not the only ones. the white house sa
seek to narrow it like when we persuade ad court to drastically limit a u.s. government request for two months of user search queries. now, keep in mind, google owns an awful lot of properties. not only is there google but gmail, youtube, picasso, online photo sharing site. feed burner, a management tool for bloggers or orkit. a networking site popular in india and brazil and android smartphone operating system. this new legal issue how much access the government should have to internet communications is subject of a conference featuring legal scholars, civil libertarians and google representatives is starting at 1230 in washington. we'll keep an eye on that. if you don't want the government to poke around your online history. delete your history. it doesn't entirely stop the access of it but limits the duration they can examine it. jon, back to you. jon: brave new world we're getting into. doug mckelway, thank you. jenna: don't why when you buy. that is the national campaign when purchasing firearms. statistics show buyers are not always completely honest. many are suspected of giving
of budweiser and corona. bud is the best-selling beer in the u.s. and corona is the best-selling import. >>> and speaking of booze, the u.s. is now the largest wine market on the planet. we consume 13% of what is produced worldwide. overseas wines now account for more than one-third of the sales. u.s. production was up 2% last year. the gallo winery is one of the hottest, increasing shipments faster than the rest of the industry. >> who new? >> i hope, since this is your last day on the early morning news, you'll have a glass of wine or two with breakfast when you get home this morning. >> yes, this is our happy hour. >> it's 5:00 somewhere, people like to say. it's been a pleasure. >> likewise, likewise. >>> well, next on this friday, bomb-detecting dogs are a key part of airport security. a new study says, they don't work. >>> and a tv veteran eyes another high-profile career. eat good fats. avoid bad. don't go over 2000... 1200 calories a day. carbs are bad. carbs are good. the story keeps changing. so i'm not listening... to anyone but myself. i know better nutrition when i see it:
over the next two years, all of our 66,000 u.s. troops currently in afghanistan -- we are leaving that country. for afghanistan that means there is going to be some significant shortfalls in combat capability. they are relying on the united states for all kinds of things. not only up until recently for being the primary fighting mechanism for the afghans, but also from a logistical standpoint and from an intelligence standpoint, we provide the bulk of support. that also includes air lifting for their troops to get a point of conflict where they need to engage with the enemy. host: as far as picking up after we leave? caller: they are not completely prepared. they have the afghan national come -- the afghan national police that is getting pretty good at their primary task of going after caliban cells. the other problem of this is an uneven prepared this. there are significant problems with training the afghan army. there are significant problems with training the afghan police. there is going to be some significant drawbacks to the drawdown announced by the president. host: "the ne
of the proudest times in my years in the u.s. senate is when a former vietnam friend spent a little time. . i was proud of the g.i. bill because we were able to get to world war ii veterans, jim webb and chuck hagel, we got together and we got the boat and passed the bill. that is the way things should work or this country. the objective was not to get jim webb or chuck hagel any credit. the inductive was to do something for the country, -- the objective was to do something for the country on the do something for the people. this kind of attention, this kind of recognition -- much of my life has been about doing everything i can in some way to help veterans and their families, whether it was a program or whatever it was. i'm proud of that. i'm more proud of that than anything else i have been involved in. i'm proud of my background and my career, like all of you are. nothing makes me prouder or has ever made me prouder. to each of you in this room, as of you who are watching this around the world, i say to you, thank you. thank you to you for your service and sacrifices. i will do everything
atannable nor desirable. host: one of the headlines this morning, january jobs again in u.s., or jobs gained rather in the u.s., 157,000. we go to pete in lakeland, florida on our line for democrats. you're on the "washington journal." caller: hey, top of the morning to you gentlemen. i know you touched a little bit on downsizing. i mean the microsoft, excel format, making everybody a number for efficiency in the efficiency experts. but man, i think capitalisms on the way to die in the united states. you got companies right now that, if you want your high tech workers and you want a submarine, the college students and the current working class in america, you go to india and you bring them over on visas. you want to crush the white collar workers, i mean unions as far as industrial are pretty much dead. you move your plants to china and mexico. host: patrick rice, your response to what he had to say. guest: if he's arguing we're on the brink of a social revolution, it would seem to me that, i can't see in the future and i don't want to say he's wrong, but we've been endured tougher economic
and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rightscivils commission began in 1957.. president eisenhower had a lot f discussions with john fostere dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states was ws seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people hear about and read about. r and the fact that they seem to be a lot of episodes that keptea happening, whether it was lunche named orth discrimination. the idea was he was going to ask congress to set a pace of the rights commission, which would put that on top of the table appeared and told by some at the meeting that he slammed the table and we're going to put the table.n top of the commissions as we know, o sometimes fed up because there'g tough problem and people don't want to do anything aboutle it.. they do a report and it goes away. this commission was supposed that the facts on top of the table and thenp its future woud depend what it found a come howt aggressive it was than what thet president.s >> host: at this poin
. speaker, this is no time to eliminate preclearance. i'm reminded of a letter i wrote to the u.s. attorney's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-autho
if not the most powerful. her career has been extraordinary. not only first lady, but a u.s. senator and secretary of state and somebody who could be again a candidate for the presidency in 2016. >> she came under fire for the attack on the consulate in ben gazay that left four americans dead and a suicide in turkey friday has been called an act of terror by the obama administration. how much will trouble in the mideast at a point her legacy? >> i don't think it will. i think her legacy is pretty clear. is there anybody who looks at her on that tape or any other tape who doesn't see someone they think can perform beautifully as president of the united states? that's a tough bar to clear, but you look at her and think about everybody feels that sense whether they agree politically or not, she is there. i think her legacy will be empowering women and girls around the globe. the 112 countries she visited, not a woman or girl who doesn't think they have rights and abilities they didn't have without hillary plugging for them. the fact that she harnessed high technology. her view is that the cold war an
returned from north korea, former new mexico governor, bill richardson, who served as u.s. ambassador to the united nations. thank you so much for joining me. >> thank you, alex. nice to be with you. >> this trip, what was it all about? how did it come about and what was the mission? >> well, the mission was threefold. one, to send a message to the north koreans not to do any more launches or nuclear tests. secondly, to talk about the advantages of an internet and freedom of information once they join the international community. and third was to try to get the american detainee, kenneth bay, out who's been in prison there. we did get hints from the north koreans that they were going to do this nuclear test because they were upset about the sanctions the united nations had just imposed on them. and we side to them, it makes no sense for you to continue further testing. you're going to be more isolated. your people are hurting. get into the international community. but our message was to the foreign ministry types, their state department. we didn't see the new leader who unfortunately
be a threat? also in a few minutes u.s. senate expected to vote on chuck hagel president obama's controversial nominee for defense secretary. we'll bring to it live. more on what's going on in egypt right now. a holt air balloon carrying lots of tourists explodes and plummets to the ground. we're finding out how this could happen. we're going live to egypt. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with the huge winter storm, the national weather service is now calling historic. cities like amarillo, texas, wichita, kansas have broken snowfall records. 45 million in 21 states are being affected one way or another. the storm is blamed for at least three deaths. look at this. it's even dangerous after the storm blows away. in kansas city, the heavy wet snow is causing roofs to collapse. nobody was hurt in this building. but the snow is also bringing down tree limbs on to power lines. in kansas city thousands of people are reported without power. george, what's going on? >> reporter: this is par for the course here in the midwest. this is the second time in a week that this r
. ♪ stay in the groove with align. >>> the u.s. government is spending about $3.8 trillion this year but if there's no deal by friday night, agencies will have to cut a fraction of that, about $85 billion clarz. so our big question is that, why would that amount have an impact in the overall economy. tom foreman is analyzing that. have you figured it out, tom? >> when you look at the $3.8 trillion, all these different programs out here, if you've cut out this amount down here, 85 billion, how can can that little slice of all this make a difference? one of the reasons it makes a difference, one of the reasons is because washington is not really looking at the whole budget and they haven't for a long, long time because what you have to consider is that all of the entitlement programs are out of the equation and these programs are bigger than all of the other programs. we aren't really cutting a whole budget. we're talking about putting these cuts in part of the budget. if you look at what has happened to entitlements, look at just defense spending. here's defense spending which is way
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
bernanke is printing dollars up a storm and that is lowering the value of the u.s. dollar and that means that oil goes up. >> no, idiot! ugh! >> then everything would be affected! >> once again -- >> stephanie: the feds making gas prices go -- i've never heard that. [ applause ] >> i'm an american. i'm appalled. what is ben bernanke doing? >> stuart varney has no idea how the economic system works. no wonder fox business is tanking. just saying. >> get you to invest in trillion dollar platinum coins. better than -- >> stephanie: wow. you're going to try that again? remember newt gingrich ran with the gas push thing? that was his prop for his campaign. i should have asked him if he had one of those left over when i ran into him at the charlotte airport. can i have one of those things? don't you have one of chose khashkies? >> acting as if gas prices go up simultaneously everywhere in the country. they don't! they've been consistently higher out here. >> we're switching over to the summer blend pretty soon. >> stephanie: it is like starbucks christmas blend. okay. mark he will vin because
and innovation, the highest honors bestowed by the u.s. government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. you will have it for you later in our program schedule. at the white house, jay carney held his daily briefing, addressing a number of issues including a bombing at the u.s. embassy in turkey today. >> does the president considered the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack? >> that is an excellent question a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. i think this is an incident that has just occurred and i don't want to get ahead of it, is being investigated. we strongly condemn what was a suicide attack against our embassy in ankara, which took place at the embassy's our security perimeter. details are still emerging about what exactly happened, who was responsible. it is clearly an act of terror. it caused -- cost hte life about least one individual, a turkish security guard. we are working with the turkish authorities to investigate the incident and bring the perpetrators to justice. our thoughts and prayers
food that this child will eat? >> reporter: nbc news has confirmed dykes served in the u.s. navy in the 60s. he served various awards, a good conduct med methal and vietnam service medal. but on tuesday those honors seem very far away. police say dykes boarded a stopped school bus and demanded two random young children. when the bus drive refused, plea say dykes shot and killed him and made off with 5-year-old ethan. kelly miller says her kids got off that bus right before the shooting. >> i cannot believe if he got on that bus with the intentions of grabbing a 6 to 8-year-old, all he had to do was reach out and grab him. he let him clear the bus and get home before all this happened. >> reporter: meanwhile the visitation for the bus driver charles pollen junior is scheduled for today. his family says he loved his job and died a hero. >> every time a child got on my dad's bus they were though longer their parents they were his. he considered them his children. i know that's the reason why my dad took those shots for his children just like he would do for me and my sister. >> repo
this week. here is the a.p. headline. u.s. limited in fight against north african militants. the united states is struggling to confront an uptick in threats in the newest hot spot with limited intelligence and few partners to help as the obama administration weighs who you to keep islamic extremists from jeopardizing national security without launching war. we want to put up a map here. and explain to people where this is. egypt, libya, algeria, mali, niger. when i read about the idea that we don't have enough intelligence, we've known about al qaeda in north africa since before 9/11. this is the original safe haven of osama bin laden, was north africa. did we drop the ball? >> you know, when al qaeda attacked the united states on 9/11, and it became clear that we had to go to war on terrorism against al qaeda, we focused on al qaeda's core leadership and where they were at. and we've done that. we've gone after them in pakistan, afghanistan, and going after them in yemen, going after them in somalia. yes, they are out there. >> it's been out there a long time, right? it's not new. >>
world war ii veterans in the u.s. senate. what's that mean for our politics and our national perspective? >>> good morning from washington. it's friday, february 15th, it's t"the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. president obama is standing by his embattled nominee for secretary of defense, chuck hagel, as hagel's former senate republican colleagues put up a major roadblock yesterday in their attempts to not just delay the nomination, but try to kill it. >> the yeas are 58, the nays are 40. one senator announced present. >> and with that senate vote, chuck hagel came up short of a 60-vote filibuster roadblock that senate republicans demanded, delaying what could still be hagel's eventual confirmation vote by at least two weeks. four republicans, mississippi's thad cochran, susan collins, mike johannes, and lisa murkowski voted. president obama was emphatic during a google plus question and answer session. >> my expectation and hope is that chuck hagel, who richly deserves to get a vote on the floor of the senate, will be confirmed as our defense secretary. it's just unfortunate that this k
. >>> from beer to wine now, when it comes to the grape, the french are taking a back seat to the u.s. a new study find americans are now the largest consumers of wine in the whole wide world. and domestic production is increasing to keep up with all that demand. wine consumption is decling ingn italy and france. >> in france? awe al >> usa! usa! usa! we are number one in something. >> in boozing. >> 8:00 in the morning when w p get home. nothing wrong with the cocktail bre breakfast. >> it is our happy hour. >> do not judge. uh-uh uh, we don't have a problem. >> here is your friday forecast. heavy snow around the great lakes. a few inches from cincinnati to knoxville. and around washington, d.c. biting cold day across the dakota and midwest. snow in the northern rockies. around boise, seattle and portland. >> in the pacific north west is 0, twin cities, and, indianapolis, sunny to the northeast. god bless america. >>> it's water, i swear. [ laughter ] >> welcome back. many people who wear glasses know all too well, uh-huh. that they can get pretty pricey. but just how much would you pay to
quite concerned about the risks from things heating up in the middle east. the u.s. economy is repairing itself. we don't have at significant housing drag that we did a year or two ago. balance sheets are repairing. yes, things seem to be heading in the right direction. but i also think that people often make the mistake of confusing the level for the growth rate. i think we need to understand that even if the economy grows at 2% or 3% this year which seems to be the optimistic but realistic forecasters out there. you are still operating in a range of high unemployment. if our economic potential grows at 3% per year and you're actual output is growing at 3% per year that means you're not going to close the gap quickly enough. one of the things maybe you can answer the question that i have not found an economist who can tell me why recent recoveries seem to be so much slower than in the past. this one is different because it is resulting from a financial shock. we don't seem to be getting the rapid upslope that you would hope in any case and that is a concern. >> i think you did answer th
and u.s. airways was approved. the new company will still be called american airways but will be run by u.s. airways management. the new american will have more than 900 planes, 3,200 flights a day and # 5,000 employees -- and 95,000 employees. what does this mean for passengers? can you say higher prices for everyone? stick around because lauren simonetti from the fox business network will be here with all the brand-new details. >>> they came face-to-face with chris dorner, the ex-cop accused of murdering four people. for the first time we're hearing from the couples he held hostage at gunpoint. karen and jim reynolds entered their cabin surprising dorner who was hiding out there. >> he came in. he had extension cords tied them around over our heads [inaudible] >> and i thought this is the end. >>gretchen: dorner left with their vehicles but the reynolds called 9 # -- 911 dorner was killed in another cabin. >> while 4,000 people are stranded at sea on a carnival cruise ship, here is the company c.e.o. at a miami heat game. passengers have been stuck on a ship since sunday. it is bei
and pension committee, thank you for joining us. >> discussing president obama's announcement that the u.s. will reduce troops sent to 34,000 by next year. the education week staff writer outlined by president obama, and the federal trade commission talked about a recent study that found that 5% of people who, it could affect their ability to borrow money. next, the u.s. army chief of staff talks about the future of the army. and then president obama on gun legislation and the plan to help the middle class. democratic leaders outlined their plans to avoid federal budget cuts. >>-saturday, we are in savannah at 4, georgia for live coverage of the book festival starting at 10:15 east turn on the future. a former navy psychologists on lessons i learned that combat hospital. the chief washington correspondent on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. a presidential historian, and of 4:00, and gary wills asks, why priests? live saturday on c-span to. >> he thought she was the smartest person he ever knew and he knew how much she loved him. he knew that she would tell him the truth. she wasn't
to make a dash for the bomb faster than the u.s. and its allies could react. >> one or two weeks, they could have enough for a nuclear weapon, and that's going to be hard to both detect and respond to. >> reporter: the fact that they were trying to break out, wouldn't that still be detectable? >> but it may be detectable after they've finished. >> reporter: he estimates iran could achieve the breakout ability by the middle of 2014. netanyahu has drawn a red line that iran could cross as early as this year. israel's red line is based simply on the amount of uranium iran has enriched. iran's intentions remain a mystery, but one thing is certain-- they keep getting better at enriching uranium. scott. >> pelley: david, thank you very much. iran will be one of the biggest challenges for chuck hagel if he is confirmed as the new secretary of defense. hagel had a rough day today at his senate confirmation hearing. the former republican senator's past statements about iran israel, and iraq drew hostile questions, and here's wyatt andrews. >> reporter: republicans charge that, in his 12 y
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)

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